What Does CPM Do?

What Does Comprehensive Pain Management Do?

Although pain centers differ in their focus and offerings, Comprehensive Pain Management involves a team of health care providers that can help you with a variety of strategies to manage and in many cases cure your pain.

We will put together a pain management plan for you which in most cases allows for return of quality of life and function while avoiding the need for risky and painful surgeries.

Strategies for Pain Relief and Management

At Comprehensive Pain Management, your therapy plan will be tailored to your specific needs, circumstances, and preferences. Depending on the cause of your pain, treatments may include one or more of the following:

Medications. In many cases, patients are prescribed treatment before receiving other forms of therapy. Medications for pain may include:

  • Non-aspirin pain relievers. These drugs, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), relieve minor pain and are sometimes combined with other drugs to provide greater pain relief.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Available over the counter or by prescription, these drugs — including ibuprofen (Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn) — are used to treat pain and inflammation.
  • Corticosteroids. Available only by a prescription, these cortisone-like drugs are used for more severe inflammatory conditions.
  • Opioid pain medications. These morphine-like drugs are often prescribed short term for acute pain or for cancer pain. Occasionally doctors prescribe them for chronic, non-cancer pain.
  • Antidepressants. Originally designed to treat depression, these drugs can be useful for relieving certain types of pain. Antidepressants may also promote sleep, which can be difficult when you are in pain.

Often medications, by themselves, aren’t enough to treat chronic pain. Other treatments may be more effective than medications, and medication may be more effective when combined with other treatments. Other available treatments offered may include:

Injections. Local anesthetics, sometimes combined with a corticosteroid, may be injected around nerve roots or into muscles and joints to relieve irritation, swelling, and muscle spasms.

Nerve blocks. If a group of nerves, called a ganglion or plexus, causes pain to a specific organ or body region, injections with local anesthetics may be useful for blocking the pain in that area.